Effective Advertising: Brand names as names of the products

This very unoriginal thought just occurred to me today: people use brand names as the name of the product.

Credit

Here is the list of words I’d use on a regular basis:

  • Kleenex = Facial Tissue Papers
  • Band-Aid = Adhesive Bandages
  • Chapstick = Lip Balm
  • Clorox = Bleach
  • Crazy Glue = Instant glue
  • Crock-Pot = Slow Cooker
  • iPod = MP3 Player
  • Glad Wrap = Plastic Wrap
  • Google = To search for something
  • Jacuzzi = Hot Tub or Whirlpool Bath
  • Jell-O = Gelatin dessert
  • Post-Its = Sticky Notes
  • PowerPoint = Electronic Presentation
  • Q-Tips = Cotton Swabs
  • Styrofoam = Polystyrene Foam (which I hate the sound of)
  • Tupperware = Food Storage Containers
  • Vaseline = Petroleum Jelly
  • Xerox = To Photocopy
  • Ziplock Bags = Reusable Zipper type storage bags

I know in other languages, they also use the brand name as the name for the product itself.

I of course, cannot think of any right now but I do remember hearing a lot of that in France when I was there, and asking what [brand name] was.

Totally unrelated random thought to words:

When I worked in fast food, I would ask if people wanted any cutlery with their takeout. 75% of the time, I’d get a blank stare until I waved the plastic fork and spoon in their face.

I finally learned to say: do you want a plastic knife, fork or spoon with that?

Why we didn’t just leave them out for people to take was beyond me, until I realized that people actually STEAL cutlery to use at home, even if they didn’t eat at the fastfood joint.

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About the Author

Just a girl trying to find a balance between being a Shopaholic and a Saver. I cleared $60,000 in 18 months earning $65,000 gross/year. Now I am self-employed, and you can read more about my story here, or visit my other blog: The Everyday Minimalist.